Passing ice-cream van –
On suburban washing lines
Summer dresses dance.
~~~
(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

I walk on ripples –

The sea’s great footprint shifting

Under my small step.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Still it is light

Yet the rock rose petals lie

Already scattered.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Longest day

Wildflowers in the shingle

Scent of broom.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Linked to Carpe Diem Summer solstice

The thatcher’s brown dog

Curled up in leftover straw

Bundle of bristles.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Spring is fading –

Against the tumbledown house

Wisteria weeps.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

For Carpe Diem:  a carpet of purple

And here are the two haiku I wrote for the Carpe Diem kukai back in March before the wisteria came into bloom here in the UK.

Bare and twisted,

Amid crowds of crocuses,

Wisteria waits.

~~~

March wisteria –

On old, twisted branches hangs

Anticipation.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

A quill-shaped cloud

Pen poised over blank page

What to write?

P1010719

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

For Carpe Diem: Cloud

Docklands rainbow –

Do the bankers see it

Or a pot of gold?
image

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Written for Carpe Diem

I was at a meeting at the HQ of one of the big UK banks earlier this year, in Canary Wharf in London’s Docklands. We were having a coffee break when there was a collective intake of breath and we all whipped out our iPhones – you can see why. The low building in the foreground is Billingsgate fish market – apart from that and the occasional rainbow (or two), it’s all tower blocks in every direction.

A brown leaf

Flutters back on the bough –

Perching sparrow.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

For Carpe Diem, where the task was to write a riddle haiku. I’ve adapted one of my earliest haiku.

Cradle rock –

Waves sing lilting lullabies

For seagull chicks.

~~~

(c) Jackie Le Poidevin

Cradle Rock is at Moulin Huet, a cove at the bottom of the cliffs in Guernsey (where I grew up). The image below shows one of 15 canvases of the bay painted by Renoir on a visit to the island in 1883. The area is named after a former watermill owned by a Monsieur Huet (pronounced locally as “Whet”).

image

For Carpe Diem: A Clam, in which Chevrefeuille explored a haiku by Basho about Japan’s Wedded Rocks that is full of double meanings.